In-the-know style hunters in Honolulu head to our Museum Shops for contemporary jewelry—where fascinating new designs are constantly coming in. Especially in the run-up to Valentine’s Day. Here are the latest tasty options, some of them made from recycled and reclaimed materials to go with our new exhibition Plastic Fantastic?.

Local beach glass jewelry artist Karen Tanigawa is a third-generation beachcomber and self-taught wire wrapper. She also inherited a huge collection of beach glass from her aunt, the late State Rep. Lisa Naito. “Years ago, people used to burn their rubbish by the coastlines, and the tides would take shards of glass out into the ocean. It would return to the beach 30 years later as jewelry-quality beach glass.” She fancifully converts the glass into wearable art. Perhaps most striking are her pieces using rare orange glass—we’ve never seen that before! Pendants $70 and up; earrings: $96 and up. Available only at Beretania Street location.

Beach glass pendants

Pendants Karen Tanigawa created from her aunt’s beach glass collection.

We’ve got all kinds of merchandise related to our exhibition Harajuku: Tokyo Street Fashion, and perhaps the cutest of all are the items from Japanese brand Q-pot. The company feels it goes beyond being a brand and thinks of itself as a “communication tool”—”we are sure that if everyone is happy and feels good, peace can spread more easily in the world.” And just look at their kawaii creations—whomever you give these to will be all smiles. Necklaces $75 and up; rings $45 and up; bag charms $60 and up. Available only at Beretania Street location.

Q-pot aims to promote peace thorugh its jewelry and accessories

Q-pot aims to promote peace through its jewelry and accessories

Ghanaian jewelry artist Rita Addo Zakour creates the bold beads in her necklaces by melting and molding recycled plastic bottles. The result are lustrous orbs that hold their own against semiprecious stones like malachite and tiger’s eye. These pieces are eco-friendly by taking plastic out of our waste stream, and are part of our shop collection inspired by Plastic Fantastic? Earrings $25-$35, necklace $85. Available only at the Spalding House location.

Rita Addo Zakour makes her jewelry with repurposed plastic.

Rita Addo Zakour makes her jewelry with repurposed plastic.

Based in North Kohala on Hawai‘i Island, Beth Bohn crafts one-of-a-kind jewelry that tells stories of her life and Hawai‘i. Nothing is off limits in Beth’s creations, which incorporate such disparate elements as repurposed vintage watches, delicate crocheted semi-precious stone chains, chunky freshwater pearls, lace, and leather. Necklaces $140 and up; bracelets $60 and up. Available at Beretania and Spalding House locations.
Beth Bohn's delicate creations combine hand-crotcheted chains with semiprecious strones such as tourmaline, labradorite, amazonite and freshwater pearls.

Beth Bohn’s delicate creations combine hand-crotcheted chains with semiprecious strones such as tourmaline, labradorite, amazonite and freshwater pearls.